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Our Montalbano Tour

18 Dec

Although many people visit Taormina to get close to Mount Etna, Len and I had a different plan. Our goal was to visit many of the shooting locations of one of our favorite Italian detective stories, Il Commissario Montalbano. The episodes are based on novels by author Andrea Camilleri. They are set in the imaginary town of Vigàta but many shooting locations are in the province of Ragusa. Montalbano is played by the Italian actor Luca Zingaretti.

We got hooked on watching Italian shows many years ago as part of our never-ending quest to speak and understand Italian better, and also to learn about parts of Italy we had yet to visit.

Taormina is certainly not the best base to begin this excursion as the sites are hours away, but that didn’t deter us. I found an excellent driver, Alessio Patanè, (info@sicilygrandtour.com), who met us at 8 AM in Taormina.

Our first stop, and the opening shots of the episodes, are overlooking Modica. We were stumped on the significance of this view – the open center being the shooting location for Livia’s bus stop.

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We did, however, recognize the Cathedral of San Giorgio, aka the Church of Vigàta.

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Next stop, (not Montalbano related), the oldest chocolate factory in Sicily. Need you ask if I bought some?

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From there on to Scicli, aka Vigàta.

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The show’s police headquarters and commissioner’s office are both housed in the local town hall.

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Filming for the episodes happens on location during many months of the year, but the office set ups are often broken down and moved to Cinecittà, a large film studio in Rome. We were fortunate as they had recently been shooting scenes, so the offices were completely in tact when we visited.

Stepping inside, one immediately recognizes the staircase Montalbano climbs to visit his boss, the commissioner,

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as well as the commissioner’s office.

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After hearing about the some of the artifacts in the office, we headed downstairs to Montalbano’s office.

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Immediately on the right is Catarella’s office.

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then Fazio’s office leading to Montalbano’s.

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Enrico, our wonderful tour guide, was so knowledgeable and entertaining.

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He was also eager to show us a filming stunt. Below is the familiar door to Mimi’s office, which is actually not an office at all but a wall. Mimi’s only office exists in the studios in Rome.

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One highlight not visible in the series is the incredible ceilings in the eighteenth century building.

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After thanking Enrico, we walked the familiar streets of Vigàta before heading to lunch.

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Then time for Len’s one request – to eat along the sea at the place Montalbano frequents, and so we did. Picture perfect.

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After lunch, we walked along the beach in Punta Secca (aka Marinella)

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until we came upon this sign…

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and then the very familiar home of Montalbano.

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It was easy to see why this house was selected as Montalbano’s home and equally funny to see a pizzeria a few doors away – oh what fame can due to a town!

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In reality, it doesn’t appear that fame has spoiled this quiet beach town at all. No one was even home when I knocked.

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From here, on to our final stop, the incredible vistas of Ragusa and Ragusa Ibla, which we learned about from episodes. As Camilleri once said:

….there is a literary Vigàta, which is based on my hometown, and then a Vigàta used as the set for the TV series, which is based on beautiful places such as Scicli, Modica and so on. Now that happens to me when I’m writing a new Montalbano story: I’m influenced not so much by the Montalbano TV character but the scenery seen on television..   Andrea Camilleri

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Whether or not you are a fan of the Montalbano books/tv series, these sights in many remote parts of Sicily are enticing and beautiful. At first we had wondered why so many widely dispersed and remote filming locations were used, but seeing them made it all so clear. Camilleri truly wanted to share lesser known parts of Sicily with his audience, and indeed he did. Clearly, his intention is what brought us to areas we might never have known, and given us another great adventure on a road less travelled.

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Ciao,
Judy

 

 

 

Ennio Morricone

5 Mar

In case you missed it, Ennio Morricone, age 87,  walked home with an Oscar this year for his original score for The Hateful Eight. Born in Rome in 1928, he has achieved incredible success as a composer, orchestrator, and conductor. Over the past seven decades, Morricone has composed over 500 scores for cinema and television, as well as over 100 classical works.

Perhaps my favorite of all of his compositions is this, from Cinema Paradiso. It always manages to bring a smile to my face and a few tears to my eyes. Turn up your volume and enjoy.

Bravo, Signor Morricone! Complimenti!

Ciao,
Judy

 

 

An Italian Hero Worth Knowing

31 Mar

This past weekend, while searching online for Italian movies with subtitles, I came across Perlasca, a 2002 Italian drama. The movie tells the true story of a real-life hero, Giorgio Perlasca, who posed as a Spanish ambassador and tricked Nazi officials in order to save the lives of at least five thousand Jews during the Holocaust.

Perlasca

Perlasca

For me, Italian films are a way to immerse myself in the Italian language and culture when not in Italy. Many historic films, such as this one, have dark sides, but also much to celebrate, such as this unsung hero.

After watching the movie, I did some research on the man, wondering how much was true. Per his obituary, I found that the man and the movie were one and the same, making the movie even more interesting and validating the second part of the movie title: the courage of a just man. Even when Perlasca returned to Italy from Budapest, he told no one of his actions. His heroism only came to light in 1989, when a group of his survivors’ relatives tracked him to Padua to thank him.

 

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http://www.euroastra.hu/node/2346 Published by: Johannes; June 6 2007 – 06:13

Perlasca is available on Netflix and other sites. Note that the subtitles were too low on the screen for the first minute while Perlasca is writing a letter to his wife in Italy, but the issue is soon resolved.

Below is Giorgio Perlasca’s obituary, by Dalbert Hallenstein, published 19 August 1992, www.independent.co.uk.

GIORGIO PERLASCA was one of Europe’s great unsung heroes. An Italian former Fascist and livestock agent who fought for Franco during the Spanish Civil War, Perlasca – posing as the Spanish charge d’affaires in Nazi-occupied Budapest in 1944-45 – saved at least 5,500 Jews from the gas chambers, constantly risking his life in doing so. Evidence is now emerging that he may have played a leading role in saving a further 60,000 people from a massacre planned by the Hungarian Nazis in the Budapest ghetto just before the Russians took over the city.
Tall, with penetrating blue eyes and closely cropped white hair, Perlasca still exuded in old age the charm and authority which allowed him to bully and cajole Budapest’s Nazi establishment into helping him save ‘his’ Jews while posing as a completely bogus Spanish representative.
His story only became known in 1989 when he was tracked down in Padua by a group of Hungarian women related to people whom he had saved. Since then he has been honoured by Israel as one of the Righteous of the Nations, a rare honour given to those few non- Jews who risked everything to save Hitler’s victims from the gas ovens. He also received the highest honours from Hungary, Sweden and Spain, whose king recently awarded him the Order of Isabella the Catholic.
Perlasca was born in the northern Italian town of Como in 1910 but was brought up and lived most of his life in and around Padua. He came from a family of civil servants, judges and army officers. He fell under the spell of Mussolini while still at school and volunteered to fight in Mussolini’s Abyssinian war of conquest and later, as a Fascist volunteer, in the Spanish Civil War.
But by 1938 Perlasca was disillusioned with Mussolini. He detested Italy’s alignment with Nazi Germany and abhorred the Italian race laws of 1936 against the Jews. Many of his friends, both in Padua and in the Italian army were, in fact, Jews.
At the outbreak of the Second World War Perlasca managed to avoid military service by working in a strategic job as a livestock agent supplying meat to the Italian armed services. In 1940 he was sent in this capacity to Zagreb and Belgrade, from where he travelled widely in Eastern Europe. Here he observed dreadful massacres of Jews, Serbs and other minorities.
In 1942 he was sent to work in Budapest, which he described as ‘hedonistic and full of life, where nothing was lacking and the restaurants and theatres were full of seemingly carefree people, many of them Jews. Perlasca, in great demand because of his Italian charm, threw himself into this life with shameless gusto.
But the good life in Budapest ended with the fall of Mussolini in July 1943. Perlasca was immediately interned as an enemy alien in a camp near the Austrian border from which he escaped (back to Budapest) on 13 October 1943, just three days before a Nazi- backed puppet government overthrew the right-wing leader Admiral Horthy, who had managed to keep at least some distance from his ally Hitler.
Knowing that he had the right to Spanish protection, as a former pro-Franco soldier, he went to the Spanish embassy where, within a day, he was given Spanish citizenship, and a new Christian name – Jorge. Outside the embassy he had noticed thousands of people milling around. He was told that they were Jews pleading for the so-called ‘letters of protection’ which Spain, together with other neutral governments, including Portugal, Switzerland, Sweden and the Vatican, was issuing to protect Jews from deportation to the Auschwitz gas chambers. The Spanish embassy officials said they were so understaffed that they could not cope with the problem.
Perlasca volunteered for the job and was accepted. He set to work, making essential contacts in various key Nazi ministries and bribing, blackmailing and charming officials and police into helping him, or at least turning a blind eye to his pro-Jewish activities.
In November 1944, with the Russians approaching Budapest, the last remaining Spanish diplomat fled the capital, leaving the embassy officially closed down. But the diplomat had forgotten to take the embassy seal with him and Perlasca set to work stamping documents which proved not only that the Spanish Embassy was still open and functioning, but that he was the last remaining charge d’affaires.
Perlasca also used the seal to issue thousands more letters of protection to Hungarian Jews whom he housed in eight rented apartment houses which he made sure flew the Spanish flag and therefore, Perlasca argued, enjoyed diplomatic protection. The bluff worked, although he had to patrol the houses night and day to make sure that roving bands of Hungarian Nazis did not break in and murder or kidnap the protected people.
This happened only once, when 300 people under Spanish protection were carted off to the Budapest goods yards for deportation to Auschwitz. And it was here, in the presence of the heroic Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg, that Perlasca’s life was saved by Adolf Eichmann during a violent row with an SS officer over two young Jewish children whom Perlasca insisted on taking away in the Spanish diplomatic car.
[Perlasca later recounting the story:]
‘A young SS major pulled out his pistol, pointing it at me. Wallenberg, who was standing nearby, shouted that he could not treat a Spanish diplomatic representative like this. Then, at a certain moment, an SS lieutenant- colonel arrived and asked what was happening. He listened, then ordered the major coldly to do nothing more because, ‘Sooner or later’, he said, ‘we’ll get the children anyway.’ They went away and it was then that Wallenberg told me that the SS colonel was the notorious Adolf Eichmann.’ 

When the news is so filled with the stories of villains, it’s wonderful to come across a true hero, especially an unsung one.

Ciao,

Judy

Cinema Paradiso

14 Dec

If you love Italian films, it’s hard not to love Cinema Paradiso, a story about love, loss and friendship set in Sicily. This year marks the 25th anniversary of the film’s release. The 32-year-old writer/director of the film, Giuseppe Tonatore, considered it semi autobiographical.

(Spoiler alert: if you have not seen the film, and plan to do so, don’t read on or watch the trailer.)

Cinema Paradiso is the beautiful, enchanting story of a young boy’s lifelong love affair with the movies. Set in an Italian village, Salvatore finds himself enchanted by the flickering images at the Cinema Paradiso, yearning for the secret of the cinema’s magic. When the projectionist, Alfredo, agrees to reveal the mysteries of moviemaking, a deep friendship is born. www.miramax.com/movie/cinema-paradiso

In the final scene, Salvatore, having returned to his native town for the funeral of his “father-figure” and mentor Alfredo, views the film reel gifted to him by Alfredo’s wife. Much to Salvatore’s surprise and delight, the old film reel contains all the kissing scenes that were cut by the local priest over the years when Alfredo and Salvatore screened the films together for the local cinema.

For your viewing pleasure, sit back and enjoy Cinema Paradiso’s final scene set to stirring music by Ennio Morriconi entitled Love Theme for Nata.

Ciao,

Judy

For more on the film’s history,
http://www.italymagazine.com/featured-story/celebrating-25th-anniversary-nuovo-cinema-paradiso

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